International Entrepreneur Rule

The Entrepreneur Rule that was set to go into effect on July 17, 2017, has been delayed until March 18, 2018, to allow the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) an opportunity to review the rule in light of President Trump’s Executive Order 13767, “Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements.” 

President Trump’s Executive Order 13767 requires federal agencies to review any procedures for granting parole and change any procedure that proposes a threat to the United States’ security. In consideration, the DHS is taking comments from the public in consideration of whether the rule should be finalized.

Unfortunately, there is a possibility that the Entrepreneur Rule never goes into effect and because the DHS decides the rule proposes an unlawful security risk in light of Trump’s executive order.  

On July 17, 2017, the international entrepreneur rule will take effect, which permits the Secretary of Homeland Security to grant parole admission on a case-by-case basis to immigrant entrepreneurs who will increase job growth and provide a significant public benefit to the United States. The goal of the international entrepreneur rule is to allow The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to improve start-up success by increasing and enhancing entrepreneurship, innovation, and job creation.

For a start-up to qualify it must have been founded in the last five years, must have been founded in the United States, and must demonstrate a substantial potential for growth. In addition, only three immigrant entrepreneurs may receive parole admission per company. Applicants are only eligible if their company meets the above criteria. While each applicant is reviewed on a case-by-case basis, the international entrepreneur rule established general criteria for the DHS to consider.

General Criteria

The applicant entrepreneur must demonstrate that he/she has significant ownership of the company, at least 10%, possesses critical operational knowledge that would assist growth in the United States, and the company has received a large financial investment. To demonstrate financial liquidity the applicant’s start-up have received investments of $250,000 or more from U.S. investors or have received $100,000 or more in government grants.

If an applicant does not meet one of the above requirements, he/she may still be considered for parole admission if the entrepreneur can demonstrate his/her company will offer a significant public benefit. For example, the start-up will create jobs in the United States.

The DHS reviews all parole admission in the totality of the circumstances – in light of all the applicant’s information is there reasonable certainty the applicant will provide the United States with a significant public benefit. Included in the totality of circumstances are general immigration requirements, i.e. background check, possessing good moral character, passing medical examination.

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