litigation

Public Charge Final Rule

UPDATE: As of February 24, 2020, the public charge rule has been implemented nationwide after the Supreme Court stayed the limited state-wide injunction in Illinois against the Department of Homeland Security.  At the same time, the Department of State also began implementing its amended public charge rule, and visa applicants from abroad should prepare Form DS-5540 ahead of their visa interview in case the consular officer requests it.  For more information read the announcement on the Department of State's website.    On January 30, 2020 the USCIS announced that it will resume enforcing the Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds Final Rule (“Final Rule”) and begin implementing it on February 24, 2020. Foreign nationals who are applying for visas and green cards from within the United States — through a process known as “Adjustment of Status” — will be subject to the Final Rule starting on February 24, 2020.  For visa applicants who are outside of the country, the Final Rule has not yet been implemented. The Department of State announced in October 2019 to delay enforcement until they first finalized their own information collection form and changes that they would need to make to their policy manual. The Final Rule had originally become effective on October 15, 2019 but was enjoined due to litigation after lawsuits were filed to prevent the Trump Administration’s attempt to enforce the Public Charge rule, which was seen as an effort to expand the government’s ability to deny access to green cards or visas for legal immigrants who would become dependent on public assistance. On January 27, 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court lifted the injunction and allowed the Final Rule to go forward, with exception to the State of Illinois, where the Final Rule remains enjoined. This article offers information concerning the Final Public Charge Rule, what factors will be taken into consideration, and which individuals are likely to be affected by the change. Background on the Public Charge Rule Who is subject to the public charge inadmissibility ground? Unless specifically exempted by Congress, all foreign individuals seeking immigrant or nonimmigrant visas abroad are subject to the public charge inadmissibility ground, as are individuals seeking admission to the United States on immigrant or nonimmigrant visas, and individuals seeking to adjust their status. In certain cases, even lawful permanent residents returning from a trip abroad will be subject to inadmissibility determinations, depending on the circumstances. Immigrants who have been exempted by Congress from the public charge ground of inadmissibility include refugees, asylees, and Afghans and Iraqis with special immigrant visas. For a general overview and developments in this area read our previous articles here.

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H-1B for Computer Programmers

The Immigration and Nationality Act allows an employer to petition for an H-1B visa on behalf of an alien beneficiary if the alien beneficiary will be working in a “specialty occupation.”  To qualify as a “specialty occupation” a job must require "theoretical and practical application of a body of specialized knowledge and attainment of a bachelor's or higher degree in the specific specialty (or its equivalent) as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the United States." An employer bears the burden of proof to demonstrate that its open position requires specialized knowledge and a bachelor’s degree. Traditionally, USCIS has regarded the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) as the foremost authority on job educational and skill requirements (even in spite of an OOH disclaimer that the publication is not intended for legal usage); however, an employer may submit additional supporting documentation. The evidence, in its totality, must demonstrate that a particular position would normally have a minimum, specialty degree requirement, or its equivalent, for entry. If the USCIS finds the evidence insufficient it will issue a Request for Evidence (RFE) or simply deny the H-1B petition. For several decades employers have faced varying degrees of difficulty in obtaining an H-1B visa for computer programmers and information technology (IT) professionals. Under the Trump Administration, the USCIS has cracked down on computer programmer H-1B visa applications and increased the burden of proof required for a visa to be approved. In 2017 approximately 50,000 less IT related visas were issued than in 2016. Employers should provide additional documentation to support that a computer programmer position meets the H-1B visa qualifications. Additionally, employers may need litigation to obtain a proper ruling.  Why are Computer Programmers in Question?  In 2000, the NSC Director stated that the computer programmer occupation was in “transition,” which means the educational requirements and job duties were changing and establishing a clear line on H-1B eligibility was difficult.  Despite almost two decades having passed, the computer programmer occupation is still considered to be in “transition.” The OOH states most computer programmers have a bachelor’s degree, but some employer’s hire computer programmers with an associate’s degree or no college education. Furthermore, most computer programmers have a bachelor’s degree in a computer-related field. The level of difficulty associated with the job duties are often reflected by employer’s requiring a higher level of education. For example, a computer programmer that enters code may not be required to hold a bachelor’s degree, but a computer programmer that analyzes and repairs code may.

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